Booker Hill Primary and Nursery School

Booker Hill Primary and Nursery School

"Learning Without Limits"
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Reading Strategies

In 2016, we reviewed our strategies for teaching reading and after much research, selected several new approaches to support our existing practice.

We are very excited about the strategies listed below as they have all been proven to support reading for pleasure.

Reading with RIC

Reading with RIC is a whole class approach that was designed by primary school teacher Jo Payne. In her blog, available here, Jo explains the reasoning behind the strategy. RIC sessions consist of pupils sharing a visual or auditory text such as a film clip, picture or piece of music and then discussing and answering retrieval, inference and choice questions based on what they have seen or heard.

In Key Stage 1, responses are discussed orally and early indications show that the pupils are really enjoying the discussions. Through sharing their responses, pupils will be developing their reading skills while acquiring new vocabulary.

In Key Stage 2, pupils writing is supported through them providing a written response following the whole class discussion. Already, it is obvious that the approach is helping the pupils to develop more detailed responses that show their developing inference skills.

Use the slide below and follow the link to see how the RIC strategy works.

The Lighthouse Video Clip  

 

Paired Reading

During paired reading, classes pair up with another to enjoy a paired reading session. Paired reading is a scheme that involves one pupil (the tutor) supporting another pupil (the tutee) with their reading. Traditionally, the most effective schemes are where the tutor is older than the tutee (two years’ difference being the optimal gap) and so in the Autumn term, our pupils are paired according to this research based suggestion.

Term

Tutees

Tutor

Autumn

2

4

3

5

A paired reading scheme has many benefits in terms of developing a whole school ethos of reading for pleasure.

“The boost to school pupils’ attainment provided by peer tutoring was equivalent to about three months progress in both maths and reading.” September 2011, University of Durham

Benefits for the tutee

  • Improved reading attainment – decoding and comprehension of words and text
  • Increased confidence and enjoyment of reading
  • Improved attitudes to reading for pleasure and increased amount of reading outside of school
  • Interaction with a positive peer role model – learning from their positive behaviour
  • Personal 1-to-1 attention, allowing them to work at their own pace
  • Increased sense of belonging in the school community 

Benefits for the tutor

  • Development of interpersonal skills through experiencing a deeper sense of responsibility, dedication and pride in being able to help a peer
  • Improved speaking and listening skills through asking meaningful questions and active listening
  • Improved attitudes to reading for pleasure and increased amount of reading outside of school
  • Increased sense of belonging in the school community

Benefits for the school

  • Improvement in attainment
  • An effective supplement to high-quality teaching
  • Improved school community cohesion – pupils in different year groups getting to know and supporting each other

During paired reading sessions, pupils share books selected by either the tutor or the tutee and read them together in a relaxed and supportive environment.

 

Reciprocal Reading

 

Reciprocal reading is a group approach to reading so it is ideal to use in guided reading. It is an effective and proven approach to developing reading and comprehension.  It is particularly effective with children who can decode but do not fully understand what they read.

Reciprocal Reading will help children with:

  • Understanding including explaining their understanding to others
  • Reading for details within the writing
  • Increase confidence when reading new or unfamiliar texts
  • Broaden reading repertoire
  • Increase understanding of vocabulary
  • Question the meaning of words or what they have just read
  • Be able to read specialist texts from different curriculum areas

During a reciprocal / guided reading session, pupils will adopt one of five roles (predictor / question generator / clarifier / summariser / the boss) and will use the skills associated with each role to broaden their understanding of a text. Through adopting a role, every child is focused during a session and will begin to transfer the roles and skills when reading texts beyond the guided sessions.

Teachers plan Reciprocal / Guided Reading using a range of resources from across the school. The books chosen ensure that the reading level is matched to reading ability and includes fiction, non-fiction, poetry and plays.

During sessions, reading is assessed using National Curriculum objectives, which are detailed on reading lesson plans. Half termly, summative reading assessments inform the selection of these objectives and progress is recorded using the Target Tracker school assessment system.